Glossary from 'Painted' Document

    There are several ways to create and add text to glossaries, and there is not a single 'right' way to do so. Other sections describe routines you can follows. This is perhaps the easiest one based on the 'color structure' associated with a fully prepared glossary. This technique was derived from an inquiry from a user who saw the 'apparent' structure of a glossary (red, blue and black text), but who missed the bookmarks as an essential element.

    This user observed that a typical Pathagoras glossary had this structure for each term:

RedLine (a single word representing the term name1)

Blue Line (one or more words representing the subject of term1)

Body Text 1. User designed, with as much or as little formatting as desired. Body text can be as short as a single word, or long as desired. It can be multiple paragraphs; can contain bullets and automatic paragraph numbers, headings, anything!

 

RedLine (a single word representing the term name2)

Blue Line (one or more words representing the subject of term2)

Body Text 2. User designed, with as much or as little formatting as desired. Body text can be as short as a single word, or long as desired. It can be multiple paragraphs; can contain bullets and automatic paragraph numbers, headings, anything!

 

. . .  and so on. (Note that the red line is a single word. The blue line can be multiple words. Note also that there are no spaces between the red and blue lines. There should be no space between the blue line and the body text unless the space is intentional. More on this below.)

    However, without bookmarks, the text is not (yet) a glossary. So the next step is to add bookmarks. (Bookmarks are MSWord elements that delineate blocks of text. Your current document may already have bookmarks in it. This process will add more, but it won't negatively affect the document in any regard.) PATHAGORAS DOES THAT FOR YOU AUTOMATICALLY.

    To convert the painted document to a glossary, only a couple of additional steps are needed:

1.Make sure that the document is properly structured. The glossary term (red) names must be valid bookmark names. The rules are few, but the term name must start with a letter (not numbers). Numbers can only be used after the first character. No spaces or special characters allowed. An underscore ('_') can be used to connect words to create a 'single' word.

2.The Subject (blue line) can be any length. No restriction. It should meaningfully describe the clause. But it should be relatively short, generally fewer than 40 characters.

3.REMEMBER: DON'T WORRY ABOUT BOOKMARKS. THEY ARE NEEDED, BUT YOU DON'T ADD THEM. PATHAGORAS DOES!

4.If not already saved, save the document with the name 'Glossary' as the last word in the name (e.g., Will Clauses Glossary.docx"). If the document has already been properly named and saved (even if it contains bookmarks from previous sessions), skip this step.

5.Now, let's get Pathagoras to add bookmarks. Follow one of these two methods to add the bookmarks.

i.From the Pathagoras Features List, click Editing Tools | Glossary Floating Toolbar. From the Other Actions list in that Toolbar, click Create Glossary from Painted Document:

Glossary Floating Toolbar          

ii.From the Pathagoras Features List, click Editing Tools | Glossary Tools. Click the Conversion tab and click the Multicolored (red and blue, of course) button that reads "Convert Painted Document to Glossary.

4. It takes only a few seconds to add the bookmarks. The bookmarks will surround the body text, and will bear the names of the red text. Your glossary is ready to go!

tip The red or blue that you choose is a pretty specific shade. If you have the wrong hue, Pathagoras will not find it. Not to worry. Pathagoras can insert a snippet of sample text with the colors you will need. Once the snippets are in your document, use the Word's format painter (the 'paintbrush' in the Home tab) to 'paint' the appropriate colors onto the Names and Subject text:

If using technique 3i above, click 'Paint Chips' just beneath the 'Create Glossary from Painted Document.'

If using technique 3ii, click the Paint Chips button at the right of the 'Convert Painted Document to Glossary'

 

informationThe document you are converting should not have stray (or intentional) red text that does not signify a Name. Pathagoras is looking for the specific color as the clue for when a glossary term starts and ends. An unexpected word in red will throw of its hunt.